Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12153/1187
Title: Antiochia Syryjska jako ośrodek ascezy i monastycyzmu w drugiej połowie IV w.
Other Titles: ANTIOCH IN SYRIA AS AN ASCETIC AND MONASTIC CENTER IN THE SECOND HALF OF THE FOURTH CENTURY
Authors: Szczur, Piotr
Keywords: monastycyzm; asceza; synezakt; Antiochia Syryjska; Jan Chryzostom; Teodoret z Cyru; Libaniusz; monasticism; asceticism; syneisaktism; Antioch in Syria; John Chrysostom; Theodoret of Cyrus; Libanius
Issue Date: 2018
Publisher: Wydawnictwo KUL
Citation: "Vox Patrum" 70 (2018), s. 45-69
Abstract: The article presents a particular phase in the evolution of Christian asceticism, as exemplified by the monastic-ascetic milieu of Syrian Antioch. The writings of John Chrysostom, Theodoret of Cyprus and Libanius, which all refer to ascetic and monastic life in Antioch and its environs in the second half of the fourth century, are examined. These analyses allow us to identify three types among Antiochian ascetics. First group described included lay inhabitants of Antioch, both male and female, who endeavored to conduct a deeper spiritual life; this group included also persons practicing syneisaktism – a specific mode of ascetic life in which female virgins consecrated to God lived together with men (especially clergy) practicing ascesis. The second group consisted of rustic ascetics, to wit both lay and clergy inhabitants of villages around Antioch who conduced an ascetic lifestyle. The third group were those ascetics who observed monastic (or semi-monastic) life in the Antiochian mountains, especially on Mount Silpios. Monks were held in considerably high esteem, enjoying great respect among the inhabitants of Antioch. This resulted in their occasionally ignoring the rules of detachment from the world and of solitary life, as they entertained visitors or guests and – for serious reasons (e.g. during the trial of inhabitants of Antioch following the tax rebellion in 387) – visited the city. Our analysis thus depicts Antioch and its vicinity as a center of ascetic and monastic life. The clear-cut conclusion that emerges is that pre-monastic and monastic forms of ascetic life both existed in Antioch in the second half of the fourth century.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12153/1187
DOI: https://doi.org/10.31743/vp.3197
Appears in Collections:Vox Patrum, 2018, Vol. 70

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